Dead Zone Bigger than Ever – Report Reveals America’s Largest Meat Companies’ Role in Polluting Gulf of Mexico

Guest blog by Matt Rota, Gulf Restoration Network Originally posted August 2, 2017 on the Gulf Restoration Network Website https://healthygulf.org/blog/dead-zone-bigger-ever-report-reveals-americas-largest-meat-companies-role-polluting-gulf-mexico   Today, researchers from Louisiana State University (LSU) and the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON) announced that the 8,776 square mile (New Jersey-sized) Dead Zone is the...

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Mississippi River Mayors Speak Up for Clean Water

Mississippi River Mayors Speak Up for Clean Water July 10, 2017 Contact: Brooke Thurau, Mississippi River Network, 312-754-0407 (Chicago) — Seventeen mayors from states along the Mississippi River spoke up today about the need for increased efforts to improve water quality and reduce flooding impacts. The mayors threw their support behind the development of metrics and funding mechanisms for the implementation of state Nutrient Reduction...

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Little Orange Stream

The little stream was bright orange behind my grade school. Even as a first grader in the late 1960s in those days before the first Earth Day and before the Clean Water Act, I knew that it was bad to have an orange stream. The unnatural color came from a steel plant. People in the small northern Ohio town had jobs at the plant and chose not to complain about the orange color and chemical smell. Folks in neighboring communities downstream...

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Electrified Fish Fences and Oil Slicks: One Woman’s Paddling Adventure

Beginning mid-August, Margo Pellegrino will paddle her outrigger canoe from Chicago to New Orleans with the hopes of raising awareness about water quality issues. The journey will take her through the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (a human-made “hydrologic connection between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River basins”),¹ down the Illinois, Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, to Kentucky Lake, the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, and...

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Dead Zone “Fun”?

It’s the season to measure the size of the “Dead Zone” in the Gulf of Mexico. Each summer, scientists examine coastal waters off Louisiana to see how large of an area is without sea life because oxygen levels in the ocean are too low. Agricultural runoff and other nitrogen and phosphorous pollution flowing down the Mississippi River and its tributaries feed algal blooms that in turn suck up the oxygen in the water. Every year, size...

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Dead Zone Size of Connecticut Demands Federal Action

  New Orleans, LA— Every year nitrogen and phosphorous pollution gets dumped into the Mississippi River by 31 states and parts of Canada, creating an economically and ecologically disastrous dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico. New measurements from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-supported scientists report this year’s dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico to be 5,840 square miles, more than double the goal set in 2001 by the...

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Nancy Rabalais honored for Dead Zone research

Three things happen every single year: 1. As a result of fertilizer pollution from the Corn Belt, a Dead Zone appears in the Gulf of Mexico. 2. Dr. Nancy Rabalais studies that Dead Zone. 3. The Heinz Family Foundation gives out nine “Heinz Awards” honoring individuals “whose remarkable mix of vision, creativity and passion has produced significant achievements benefiting the environment.” This year, one of those awards...

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