The Natural State of Floods

In the my last blog post about flooding we talked about how floods impact our communities and can cause lots of harm and destruction. In this post we’re going to explore what floods really are. I know what you might be thinking– didn’t we already talk about this? In my first blog post we dived into what a 100-year flood is and some of the conditions that contribute to flooding. Today though I’m  going to talk about flooding beyond...

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One With the River

It was a great Wednesday. The “Dragonfly ” canoe is a couple steps away from its first layer of fiberglass. Driftwood and I closely comb over its curvature looking for places that need attention before the next phase. We smile at each other to celebrate our team’s progress. It’s an honor to be a part of building a voyager canoe. The bonding experience is priceless and it will last forever. Little did I know, our bond...

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River Management and Flooding Woes

Guest Blog by Christine Favilla, Sierra Club Originally posted in the Nicollet Island Coalition Blog Recent floods highlight the need for big changes in the management of the Mississippi River, changes leading to a more sustainable system with long-term objectives. Currently, those that make the final decisions of how the river is managed have been more likely to support short-term economic development for a small portion of the population over...

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The 100-Year Flood

People in riverside communities often hear the term 100-year flood, especially as snows melt and forecasters predict rainy days. This confusing term simultaneously evokes a sense of imminent large-scale disaster and feelings of safety—like we are safe from this kind of disaster for 100 years. And yet, a 100-year flood doesn’t just happen once every 100 years. In a particularly wet period, there could be a 100-year flood every year. How is...

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7 Ways to Reduce Your Land’s Impact On Flooding

Since floods can take place on a massive scale, it may be difficult to trace how the choices we make on our own land can contribute to flooding. However, owning land means having a relationship to rainwater flow; “Everyone lives in a watershed,” as the saying goes. Making a difference in mitigating local flooding or a massive Mississippi River flood is not exclusive to large agricultural areas. With the continual expansion of urban centers...

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Ashes to Ashes – Floods to Floods – June Newsletter

Always Learning Something New Recent research is shining fresh light on the ancient River city of Cahokia. Named a World Heritage Site in 1982, professional archeologists and amateur historians alike have long been fascinated by Cahokia, the second largest city in North America before European colonization. Home to more people than London in AD 1250, Cahokia was situated on the eastern bank of the Mississippi River near present day St. Louis....

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Protect the Wetlands that Protect Us – May Newsletter

May 21, 2015 Hello River Citizens, Generations of people along the Mississippi River have attempted to protect themselves from flood waters with levees and with makeshift flood walls made from nothing more than sacks, sand and human energy. It’s a tremendous amount of work and though these earthen walls sometimes work, they also confine the water, channeling it’s strength, making the water run faster and highter until most often, nature...

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